(Source: natures-queen)

(via brain-d-a-m-a-g-e)

(Source: dieweltvonmatilde, via 0-vacancy)

(Source: photographyofdavidhanjani, via 0-vacancy)

druggame:

Drug Game

druggame:

Drug Game

(Source: thinksquad, via 0-vacancy)

cladinscarlet:

Healing with Anhydrite
Color: Clear, blue, gray
Appearance: Long bladed or short crystals, usually on matrix
Rarity: Obtained from specialist stores
Source: Italy
Healing: Anhydrite treats disorders of the throat, especially those caused by a difficulty in expressing oneself through a physical body. It removes retained or excess fluid and disperses swelling.
Position: Place on the throat or over the thymus gland.
(Source: The Crystal Bible by Judy Hall)

cladinscarlet:

Healing with Anhydrite

Color: Clear, blue, gray

Appearance: Long bladed or short crystals, usually on matrix

Rarity: Obtained from specialist stores

Source: Italy

Healing: Anhydrite treats disorders of the throat, especially those caused by a difficulty in expressing oneself through a physical body. It removes retained or excess fluid and disperses swelling.

Position: Place on the throat or over the thymus gland.

(Source: The Crystal Bible by Judy Hall)

The Dark Side of Emotional Intelligence

In some jobs, being in touch with emotions is essential. In others, it seems to be a detriment. And like any skill, being able to read people can be used for good or evil.

Some of the greatest moments in human history were fueled by emotional intelligence. When Martin Luther King, Jr. presented his dream, he chose language that would stir the hearts of his audience. “Instead of honoring this sacred obligation” to liberty, King thundered, “America has given the Negro people a bad check.” He promised that a land “sweltering with the heat of oppression” could be “transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice,” and envisioned a future in which “on the red hills of Georgia sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave-owners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood.”

Delivering this electrifying message required emotional intelligence—the ability to recognize, understand, and manage emotions. Dr. King demonstrated remarkable skill in managing his own emotions and in sparking emotions that moved his audience to action. As his speechwriter Clarence Jones reflected, King delivered “a perfectly balanced outcry of reason and emotion, of anger and hope. His tone of pained indignation matched that note for note.

Recognizing the power of emotions, another one of the most influential leaders of the 20th century spent years studying the emotional effects of his body language. Practicing his hand gestures and analyzing images of his movements allowed him to become “an absolutely spellbinding public speaker,” says the historian Roger Moorhouse—“it was something he worked very hard on.” His name was Adolf Hitler…..

(Source: stupidgayhomodumb, via theyellowwolf)

70sscifiart:

Richard Hescox

70sscifiart:

Richard Hescox

slugspoon:

an offering of roses

(via dehydralone)

(Source: statigr.am, via fuckyeahpaganism)

(via silvia16965)

(Source: mdme-x, via escapeherestresslater)

(Source: fyspringfield.com, via fyspringfield)